Traffic/Interest Hiding

Institutionen
  • AG Waldvogel (Distributed Systems)
Publikationen
  Zink, Thomas; Waldvogel, Marcel (2012): Efficient BitTorrent handshake obfuscation Proceedings of the First Workshop on P2P and Dependability - P2P-Dep '12. - New York, New York, USA : ACM Press, 2012. - S. 1-5. - ISBN 978-1-4503-1148-9  

Efficient BitTorrent handshake obfuscation Zink, Thomas; Waldvogel, Marcel During the last decade, large scale media distribution populated peer-to-peer applications. Faced with ever increasing volumes of traffic, legal threats by copyright holders, and QoS demands of customers, network service providers are urged to apply traffic classification and shaping techniques. These highly integrated systems require constant maintenance, introduce legal issues, and violate both the net neutrality and end-to-end principles.

Clients see their freedom and privacy attacked. Users, application programmers, and even commercial service providers laboriously strive to hide their interests and circumvent classification techniques. While changing the network infrastructure is by nature very complex, and it reacts only slowly to new conditions, updating and distributing software between users is easy and practically instantaneous.

We present a new obfuscation extension to the BitTorrent protocol, which allows signature free handshaking. The extension requires no changes to the infrastructure and is fully backwards compatible. With only little change to client software, contemporary classification techniques can be rendered ineffective.

Herkunft (Projekte)

  Zink, Thomas; Waldvogel, Marcel (2012): BitTorrent Traffic Obfuscation : a Chase towards Semantic Traffic Identification Peer-to-Peer Computing (P2P), 2012 IEEE 12th International Conference on. - Piscataway, NJ : IEEE, 2012. - S. 126-137. - ISBN 978-1-4673-2860-9  

BitTorrent Traffic Obfuscation : a Chase towards Semantic Traffic Identification Zink, Thomas; Waldvogel, Marcel With the beginning of the 21st century emerging peer-to-peer networks ushered in a new era of large scale media exchange. Faced with ever increasing volumes of traffic, legal threats by copyright holders, and QoS demands of customers, network service providers are urged to apply traffic classification and shaping techniques. These systems usually are highly integrated to satisfy the harsh restrictions present in network infrastructure. They require constant maintenance and updates. Additionally, they have legal issues and violate both the net neutrality and end-to-end principles.

On the other hand, clients see their freedom and privacy attacked. As a result, users, application programmers, and even commercial service providers laboriously strive to hide their interests and circumvent classification techniques. In this user vs. ISP war, the user side has a clear edge. While changing the network infrastructure is by nature very complex, and only slowly reacts to new conditions, updating and distributing software between users is easy and practically instantaneous.

In this paper we discuss how state-of-the-art traffic classification systems can be circumvented with little effort. We present a new obfuscation extension to the BitTorrent protocol that allows signature free handshaking. The extension requires no changes to the infrastructure and is fully backwards compatible. With only little change to client software, contemporary classification techniques are rendered ineffective. We argue, that future traffic classification must not rely on restricted local syntax information but instead must exploit global communication patterns and protocol semantics in order to be able to keep pace with rapid application and protocol changes.

Herkunft (Projekte)

  Belle, Sebastian Kay; Haase, Oliver; Waldvogel, Marcel (2010): CallForge: Call Anonymity in Cellular Networks  

CallForge: Call Anonymity in Cellular Networks Belle, Sebastian Kay; Haase, Oliver; Waldvogel, Marcel In cellular networks, the locations of all subscribers are continously tracked even when they only passively carry their mobile devices with them. This privacy sensitive data can be an invaluable source of information, not only for benevolent parties. We therefore present CallForge, the concept of a location management scheme that preserves the subscribers' anonymity -- in many cases even while they participate in a phone call -- as well as a theoretical analysis of the approach.
CallForge improves on PathForge, a previously presented location management scheme, and as such is based on ID switching that we have combined with the emulation of a media break within a single call set-up procedure. We have analyzed and compared the anonymity of PathForge and CallForges, and shown that CallForge consistently provides superior anonymity. Callforge can be implemented entirely in the end device and run on existing network infrastructure without any modifications.

Herkunft (Projekte)

  Belle, Sebastian Kay; Waldvogel, Marcel (2009): PathForge:: Faithful Anonymization of Movement Data (Distributed Systems Group Technical Report ; KN-06-03-2009-DISY-01)  

PathForge:: Faithful Anonymization of Movement Data Belle, Sebastian Kay; Waldvogel, Marcel For most mobile networks, the provider needs the current position of their users to provide efficient service. The resulting motion data is not only an invaluable source for analyzing traffic or flow patterns, but also for tracking an individual s whereabouts, even without his knowledge. Today, many carry at least one mobile networked device (cell phone, UMTS-enabled netbook, ...) with them wherever they go, day or night. The resulting motion data can be used to reveal the most intimate details of our lives, making this information extremely privacy sensitive. Nevertheless, little is done to prevent the collection of this information, on the contrary, tracking features and data are being actively collected and even marketed. In this paper, we present PathForge, a lightweight solution, which not only fulfills the provider s efficiency requirement, but continues to allow flow pattern analysis, yet provides full privacy for the user when not actively involved in a call.

Herkunft (Projekte)

  Belle, Sebastian Kay; Waldvogel, Marcel (2008): Consistent deniable lying : privacy in mobile social networks  

Consistent deniable lying : privacy in mobile social networks Belle, Sebastian Kay; Waldvogel, Marcel Social networking is moving to mobile phones. This not only means continuous access, but also allows to link virtual and physical neighbourhood in novel ways. To make such systems useful, personal data such as lists of friends and interests need to be shared with more and frequently unknown people, posing a risk to your privacy. In this paper, we present our approach to social networking, Consistent Deniable Lying (CDL). Using easy-to-understand mechanisms and tuned to this environment, it enables you to meet new friends with joint interests while limiting exposure of your private data. Not only can it be generalised to include friends of friends (transitivity) into interest search, it allows you to plausibly refute any allegations of your claimed interests. Unlike prior work, we focus on the application to similarity finding and include the novel aspects of transitivity and deniability, which are key to success in social networks.

Herkunft (Projekte)

  Belle, Sebastian Kay; Waldvogel, Marcel (2008): Major Domus Redux: Privacy in Mobile P2P Networks  

Major Domus Redux: Privacy in Mobile P2P Networks Belle, Sebastian Kay; Waldvogel, Marcel Social networks have seen an unprecedented surge of interest in the past few years. Traditionally, they are restricted to central server farms which collect huge amounts of private information from their users. This fails to address two key issues which we expect to shape future social networks: (1) including mobility and location awareness and (2) privacy concerns of the users. Our paper addresses the locality challenge by providing a distributed wireless eer-to-peer infrastructure, which enables discovering of user profiles of nearby users and their friends. More importantly, using easy-to-understand mechanisms that preserve your privacy and render the storage of plain data unnecessary, our system facilitates meeting new friends and recognising old friends in a crowd.
Unlike prior approaches in social networking, we focus on utilising mobile devices that establish direct connections to each other, broadcasting camouflaged information that preserve user privacy without losing the ability of similarity finding using a technology based on a graph representation of a user's data-set and subsequently mapped on a Bloom filter. Furthermore, our approach can be generalised to utilise an inherent property of social networks, namely transitivity, that makes it even more common to get into contact with new, like-minded people.

Herkunft (Projekte)

Mittelgeber
Name Kennziffer Beschreibung Laufzeit
Sonstige585/11keine Angabe
Weitere Informationen
Laufzeit: 01.06.2011 – 30.11.2011